Creating a New Doctor–Patient Relationship

by David Lemberg MS DC on January 20, 2016

I recently presented my talk, “Medical Ethics: Creating a New Doctor–Patient Relationship” at Jewish Family Service community group meetings at Temple Adat Shalom (Poway, CA) on 10/14/2015 and Temple Solel (Encinitas, CA) on 11/17/2015.

The talk focuses on

  • The history of medical ethics
  • How to create a mutually beneficial and effective partnership with your doctor
  • How to protect your future welfare and that of your family by creating a meaningful and practical advance directive

Today’s doctor–patient relationship requires new thinking on all sides. The Supreme Court long ago affirmed the principle of patient autonomy, that is, the patient’s right to choose or refuse medical treatment. It is no longer proper for the doctor merely to tell the patient what is to be done. Patient considerations regarding harms and benefits, as well as considerations of quality of life, must be part of the process. But such evaluations are complicated for both the patient and the doctor. The need for a new relationship, a partnership that involves shared decision-making, is now more important than ever, especially when considering end-of-life care.

I am available to present “Medical Ethics: Creating a New Doctor–Patient Relationship” at conferences and community groups.

  • Contact me via email
  • Contact me via phone: 619-540-9038

{ 0 comments }

Why Science Matters — The Ethics of Responsibility

by David Lemberg MS DC on November 11, 2012

[Published March 15, 2012 on BIOETHICS TODAY] If we were not capable of autonomous thought and merely accepted and acted on what others told us, the future prospects of our communities, nations, and race would be bleak indeed. Fortunately, a few humans are capable of independent thinking, creativity, insight, and innovation. Every “benefit” of modern existence is a direct result of independent thinking in the form of scientific activity. Those of us who live in developed nations would be very hard-pressed to get through a day without readily available electricity and running water. Imagine living without automated transportation. Imagine living without television or cinema. Imagine living without a computer.

The study, investigation, and application of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology, and their combined disciplines such as engineering, agriculture, and architecture, have given us the world we inhabit. And yet in the United States close to half the population is being trained daily to believe that science is a bad thing.

Read more at BIOETHICS TODAY

{ 0 comments }

Bioethics as a Force for Change — Health Care Policy, Financial Systems, and Environmental Conservation

November 11, 2012

[Published April 30, 2012 on BIOETHICS TODAY] “A call to arms” may be a bit martial for many bioethicists, but we live in perilous times. Meaningful action is needed across the board with respect to the functioning of government, whether federal, state, or local. We are confronted with the effects of benighted policies (or lack [...]

Read the full article →

Contraception, Women’s Rights, and Single-Payer Health Care

November 11, 2012

[Published February 20, 2012 on BIOETHICS TODAY] Contraception, women’s rights, and religious freedom have dominated the headlines in recent weeks. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the Obama Administration’s useful beginning on the road to meaningful health care reform, was signed into law in March 2010. In August 2011 the administration announced it had [...]

Read the full article →

The Supreme Court and the Affordable Care Act – Part 2

November 11, 2012

[Published March 30, 2012 on BIOETHICS TODAY] It has been a very busy week at the Supreme Court. Three days of arguments on the various challenges to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act each merited front-page coverage in The New York Times. SCOTUSblog, the blog of the Supreme Court, received more than 800,000 hits [...]

Read the full article →

Broccoli, Corporate Welfare, and the Supreme Court

November 11, 2012

[Published April 5, 2012 on BIOETHICS TODAY] Last week’s historic three days of arguments before the Supreme Court on the merits of the Affordable Care Act provided many head-scratching moments. Those naive enough to believe that the case was actually going to be considered on constitutional grounds (this being the Supreme Court, after all) were [...]

Read the full article →

The Affordable Care Act, Politics, and the Supreme Court

September 4, 2012

[Published June 29, 2012 on BIOETHICS TODAY] There appears to be hope for America, as a society, a democracy, and a nation. On June 28th, 2012 the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) by a 5–4 vote. Much was at stake, not the least of which was the possibility of [...]

Read the full article →